Know Who You Are Trying To Reach

Know Who You Are Trying To Reach

Communication, Customer, Planning, Process
There's an old saying that 50% of advertising works but no one knows which 50%. The proliferation of social media, analytics, and other tools, hasn't changed this. What we do is that for any marketing to be successful, you have to know who you are trying to reach. Media is fragmented.  The days of putting an ad on local or national television and reaching everyone is gone. Different people use media differently. If you don't know who you are trying to reach, you won't know where to put your message or what they will respond to. For example if you are advertising eldercare, you wouldn't want to advertise on Cartoon Network. You may want to advertise on Facebook since seniors are the fastest growing demographic on the service. Here are three…
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7 Myths About Digital Marketing That Keep You From Growing

7 Myths About Digital Marketing That Keep You From Growing

Communication
According to eMarketer, businesses spent more than $170 billion in digital marketing in 2015. The industry is experiencing exploding growth that all businesses should tap into. However, those that lack experience are held back by some myths attached to digital marketing. And they may be keeping your business from growing. So, let’s debunk some of the myths holding you back from getting the maximum results from your online marketing. Read the entire article at Business2Community
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Small Business and Groupon

Small Business and Groupon

Communication, Process
Groupon routinely calls small businesses to get them to advertise on the service. Consumers love the service that gives them large discounts on items and events. Businesses can advertise with no money out of pocket, so it sounds like a great deal for a business to get in front of new customers. Is it? In truth, Groupon is at best a mixed blessing for small businesses. Here is what you need to consider before using Groupon to advertise your business. Deep discount: The discount is just the starting point. Aside from the discount you are offering customers, the remaining price is split between your business and Groupon. If you offer a 50% you are only making 25%. Unless you have tremendous margins, you will lose money on the Groupon deal.…
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When You Are Networking, You Are Not Selling

When You Are Networking, You Are Not Selling

Communication
When you are at a networking event, don't focus on trying to sell to everyone. Look at it as an opportunity to be a teacher, a center of influence and a fountain of knowledge for buying what you are selling. By making a few changes to your approach, you can become a center of influence in any industry and, in effect, generate a considerable amount of word-of-mouth advertising. Go Into A Networking Event To Do Just That. . .Network. One of the biggest mistakes most people make when they network is trying to sell to someone (this happens whether or not they are showing buying signals). This is the LAST thing you should do. Don't talk about how great you are or why someone should buy from you. Just have…
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Think Creatively by Using Both Sides of the Brain

Think Creatively by Using Both Sides of the Brain

Attitude and Mindset, Communication, Innovation
Creativity is not genetically encoded. Anyone can learn to think creatively. The key is to use both the left and right hemispheres of the brain: logical and intuitive, respectively. Start by immersing yourself in a problem. Use the logical left side of your brain to understand what you know about the topic. Then switch to the right side by distancing yourself from the issue and mulling over the information. Exercise is a good way to access the visual nature of the right hemisphere. It often leads to an "ah-ha moment" where you see a new solution. Then switch back to the left hemisphere to challenge your creative breakthrough with rational thinking.
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To Persuade a Listener, Establish Common Ground

To Persuade a Listener, Establish Common Ground

Communication
It's one thing to give a smooth presentation. It's another to move the people in your audience to do something. To accomplish the latter, figure out what you have in common with the people in the room, and speak to the audience at that level. Think about the values, interests, shared experiences, or challenges that you share so you can reference them in your dialogue. This is tougher to do with a broad audience like a group of seminar participants from a variety of organizations and industries. The overlap won't be immediately evident, because there are so many perspectives and backgrounds to consider. So you'll need to work hard to find it, but that work will pay off.
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Great Leaders Present Themselves As One

Great Leaders Present Themselves As One

Communication, Leadership
The first thing someone notices about us is our appearance and behavior. It is important to watch both of these things in order to make a good first impression. There are, however, other elements that define how others see and react to. These elements combine to create your leadership image. To be considered a leader, you need to present yourself as one. These elements can get you on your way. Be In Balance: Smart leaders know how to strike a balance between being strong and supportive. You have to balance between being able to take a joke and commanding respect and authority. Being able to juggle these two is important but difficult. If take either to extremes you will lose your employees' respect. Be firm and confident but be supportive. You get…
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Silence Equals Agreement

Silence Equals Agreement

Communication
Many people assume that when they ask for feedback, people will offer their thoughts candidly and directly. But that often doesn’t happen, especially in public settings and high-stakes situations. To force people to open up, no matter how reluctant (or passive-aggressive) they may be feeling, set one key ground rule: “Silence denotes agreement.” Explain that silence doesn’t mean “I’m not voting” or “I reserve the right to weigh in later.” It means “I’m completely on board with what’s being discussed.” You must then commit to enforcing the rule. If someone — even a powerful team member or friend — buttonholes you after a meeting to express reservations about what was said, tell them, “You should have spoken up at the meeting. Now everyone is on board and the ship has sailed. Next time, say something.”
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Turn Conference Introductions into Ongoing Connections

Communication
After your next conference or networking event, social media tools can help you follow up with the people you really want to make a part of your professional network. Harvard Business Review recommends you try these strategies: Install a business-card-processing app on your smartphone that can scan cards with a camera and convert them to contact information. If you meet someone and hit it off, connect right away. Send your pal a tweet from your smartphone right then and there. At the end of each trip, make a “keeper” pile of business cards for people you want to stay in touch with, then use your business card app to capture them. Use your business card app’s social networking function to send each person a LinkedIn connection invitation. Send your “keepers” a personal e-mail…
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Do People Know What You Do?

Communication
There is an amusing group of cartoons going around social media in which an occupation is named ad illustrations show "What I think I do," "What my mother thinks I do," "What my friends think I do," and "What I really do." While the images are very funny, they do illustrate a serious question. Do people know what you really do? This has become even more difficult as people have titles such as "consultant" that doesn't say anything about what you do and is more and more being used by network marketers looking to hide what they do. In networking meetings you hear 30-second introductions that say "I help you get more customers." That's wonderful but it doesn't tell me what you do. People won't hire you if they don't…
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