4 Ways Successful People Learn More

4 Ways Successful People Learn More

Improvement
Most people are inherently inquisitive. I spend a lot of time talking with our team about the value of curiosity. But over time, we can become set in our ways. Sometimes it seems easier to shrug off a new concept or task that appears difficult than to invest the time to master it. A study at the University of Texas at Dallas found that learning challenging new skills keeps your mind sharp. Another three-month study found that adults who learned a demanding new task, such as digital photography, fared better on memory tests than control groups who spent time in less challenging pursuits, such as reminiscing with others or watching movies. Read the entire article at Inc. magazine
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Great Customer Service Is A Matter Of Timing

Great Customer Service Is A Matter Of Timing

Customer, Improvement
Customers expect more and more from the businesses they deal with. They may know they are one of hundreds of customers, but they never want to feel that way. A big part of making that happen has more to do with when you do something rather than what you do. For example, when a printer breaks down, a good customer service experience is finding out you don't have to pay for the part. That quickly turns into a poor customer service experience when it takes five weeks to get the part, particularly when its an inexpensive part. The delay in service is more important than the minimal cost. When someone is contacting customer service, the most important word to know is "now." When do they need service? Now. It may…
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What CEOs Are Reading

What CEOs Are Reading

Improvement, Personal Growth
The slightly lazier days of summer are upon the northern hemisphere, with beach vacations beckoning. South of the equator, temperatures are dipping and cozy weekends lie ahead. So what books will corporate leaders be reading in the coming months? Here are recommendations from more than a dozen, including McKinsey’s Dominic Barton, JPMorgan Chase’s Jamie Dimon, LinkedIn’s Reid Hoffman, and Corning’s Wendell Weeks. It’s an eclectic list of fiction and nonfiction, spanning everything from classics to newcomers, business topics to biographies and folk tales. Read the full article at McKinsey 
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Change Your Culture a Few  Behaviors at a Time

Change Your Culture a Few Behaviors at a Time

Improvement
Many leaders try to change their company's culture in tandem with new strategies, such as mergers or turnarounds. But most cultures are so entrenched that wholesale change is near impossible. Instead, choose your battles and focus on a few critical shifts. Observe the behaviors prevalent in your organization now. Compare that to how people would act in an ideal state where their actions supported the new business objectives. Prioritize the behaviors that will have the greatest impact on your company's ability to implement its strategy. Choose ones that will be widely visible to others and are most likely to be emulated. Emphasizing just a few will allow you to move the needle on culture change much more easily.
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8 Ways to Successfully Disrupt Your Competitors’ Sales Funnels

8 Ways to Successfully Disrupt Your Competitors’ Sales Funnels

Improvement, Process
Every company has sales and marketing strategies that are tried and true methods for success. Learning the key objectives in the competition’s sales funnel helps brands stand out, gain a larger audience and achieve industry dominance. This affects and disrupts the sales funnels of your brand’s competition as their marketing strategy and typical methods of practice have been turned upside down. With a few tips, you can disrupt a single sales funnel or an entire industry’s funnel, drawing more sales to your company. Read the entire article at Business.com
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Perception Becomes Reality

Perception Becomes Reality

Communication, Improvement
You've worked hard to build the reputation of your company as well as your own. You have a very specific vision about what you represent. With all this hard work it is difficult to accept that, when all is said and done, you don't control your image. Your image is based on the perception of others. How your customers perceive you may or may not be correct, but it is your brand. Was-Mart found this out when they tried to change their image. They designed a new logo, cleaned up and redesigned stores, and raised prices. Their sales dropped because no matter what they wanted to project, their customers perceived them as low prices. Without the lowest prices customers perceived no value to shopping there. Here are some tips to better…
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Five Surprising Ways To Boost Your Creativity

Five Surprising Ways To Boost Your Creativity

Improvement, Innovation
You might not think of yourself as especially creative. And maybe—right now—you aren't. But a growing body of scientific research suggests that anyone has the ability to become at least a little more creative than they already are, sometimes in surprising ways. Here are a few of the stranger approaches to boosting your creativity. STARE AT THE APPLE LOGO Who would've thought that you could jumpstart creative thinking just by looking at a picture? Duke University professor Gavan Fitzsimons and a few of his colleagues recently wondered if it could. They were interested in the different effects that exposure to association-laden images might have on people’s ability to think creatively. Specifically, they sought to test whether the logos of Apple or IBM—the former famous for originality and sleek design, the latter…
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Make Sure You Learn from Your Mistakes

Make Sure You Learn from Your Mistakes

Improvement
Continuing to grow and innovate means taking risks, which naturally involves making mistakes.  But mistakes don’t mean a leader should discourage experimentation. Rather, leaders should encourage people to take time to understand why mistakes happened in order to minimize them in the future. Trace previous mistakes back to their roots to identify the causes and what can be done differently next time. Use role-playing exercises, debates, or even formal business war games to think through how a new strategy might play out differently. Try to look at things from a competitor’s point of view to factor in a new perspective. Mistakes are inevitable and can be costly, so don’t waste them — learn from them. Read the entire article at Harvard Business Review 
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